Tag Archives: collage

The Scrap Bag Challenge

April is always a busy month for me. It’s pretty much the last month of the school year–so that means advising for the fall, senior art show, getting ready for graduation, etc. etc. I also have the following:

  • Three major print projects to complete right now–two of which are due by April 30th.
  • A very sick cat that I am trying to keep alive
  • Fulbright Application
  • Planning/finalizing the PRESS schedule of exhibits for the summer

So what do I do? I volunteer to partake in Crispina’s Scrap Box Challenge. Seriously. I am nuts. What is a Scrap Box Challenge? Here’s what Crispina said in her invite:

Here's my box of scraps from Crispina's Studio

Here’s my box of scraps from Crispina’s Studio

Let me inspire you to marvelousness.

I’ll send you a bag of fabric scrap from the studio.
You turn that bag of scrap into something marvelous! You can use any technique you’d like. Take pictures and post your progress here on Facebook.
Send images of your finished work to me by April 15 and be featured in my first ever virtual Earthday Art/Craft Show at www.crispina.com

 

My initial goal was to make one thing from all of my scraps–preferably something functional. When I unpacked them I realized that was not going to happen. I have random sweater scraps as well as some brown wool strips from an old shirt. I fused and sewed the brown strips back together to make this fab skirt.

Scrap Parallel14 Scrap Parallel15 Scrap Parallel17

 

 

 

 

And now I have all of these scraps remaining.Scrap Parallel18 I’ve gotta do something with them by April 15th.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I know I want to make little bird sculptures. I’ve been wanting to do that for ages. And I’m also going to make some pillow covers or “quilt drawings/collages”, I think, thanks to inspiration from artist Karen Anne Glick. Karen lives in Carlisle, PA. I am discovering her because she is also part of the Scrap Bag Challenge. I wish she lived closer. She seems to be doing some similar things with her art practice as I do. I would love to chat with her. Check out her quilted drawings. She worked to make one of these a day in 2012 and then wrote something to go along with them. Sounds a lot like my mantra cards, right? She’s my new favorite artist.

Anyways. Follow the Scrap Bag Challenge on Facebook to see what others are doing.  And maybe I’ll post a few more creations later in the week.

 

Meeting Gloria Steinem

Gloria. G-L-O-R-I-A.

Gloria Steinem spoke at MCLA this week as part of the Ruth Proud Charitable Trust Public Policy Lecture. It’s been on my calendar to attend since early September 2013.

She spoke about the importance of letting go of labels, gender equality, the end to violence, connecting in person in our technological times and the continued need to organize and act for social justice. She laughed, smiled with ease and gave the impression that I too, could do “this.” “This” meaning the great work of one’s life–for everyone that will be different. Yet, next to the importance of being together with others, my big take-away was that there is still much to do for all peoples of the world. And that each of us can find our niche where we make a difference, but that we must do it and we must do it together.IMG_2765

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A complete bonus and absolute surprise came when I was invited a few hours before to a very small reception before her talk. It was a great opportunity for me to connect with a number of faculty and other people at MCLA that I don’t normally see. In some ways, I’m not sure which was more important for me–connecting with these other women, or hearing Gloria speak. It all comes together in her words–Because we were here today, hopefully each of us will have a better tomorrow.

And, I did get to meet her briefly–and give her one of our PRESS calendars–based on our popular monthly mantra cards that feature inspiring quotes from notable women. I hope she liked it.

What’s inspiring me now

I spent a good part of my day working on possible collages for Alchemy Initiative’s  upcoming 10×10 exhibition in Pittsfield. (In between two glorious ice-skating sessions on a lovely pond and then Queechy Lake!)

The exhibit opens on February 16th, from 5-6 pm followed by performances and other events. You can find more info about the 10×10 Festival here.

I was invited, along with a number of other women ages 10-100 to create a work of art that answers the following question:

‘What are the 10 things that inspire you most at this decade of your life?’.

From these inspirations, each girl/woman will create a piece of artwork. The visual exhibit, curated by the amazing Diane Firtell, will read like a timeline of inspiration. Beginning as you enter at one side of Y Bar is the work of young artists under age 10. The artwork and lists of what inspires the artists continue around the room, where it ends with the artwork of women aged 90 to 100. I am so excited to be in this exhibit with some of my favorite Berkshire County women including  Amelia Wood, Jordan Skowron, Rebecca Weinman, Laurie Coyle, Sophia Lee, Gabrielle Senza, Melanie Mowinski, Suzi Banks Baum, Karen Arp-Sandel, Nina Silver, Diane Sullivan, Diane Firtell, and Roselle Chartock, to name a few. I can’t wait to see what everyone makes

So today. I reviewed my list of inspirations, and started to play around with materials. My final compositions will not illustrate these inspirations, instead, will be inspired by it. My list:

  1. Little dots=pathways, words, memories, ideas of journey
  2. Circles=widening/narrowing
  3. Trees=relationship of tree dense space/treeless space to poverty, hunger, wealth
  4. Rilke
  5. Color=juxtaposed with black and white
  6. Standing up for what is right
  7. Mindfulness, meditation, prayer, intention
  8. Repetition, pattern
  9. Overconsumption throughout our society
  10. Slowing down, aging, changing priorities

I have two possibilities at the moment. I’m certain that these will change in the next couple of days and that a third one will be thrown in the mix as an option. The orange/green one with the figure holding the orb will definitely have some text added in–hopefully one of my more favorite lines of Rilke’s. The other may lose the white circles, but the figure and the infrared center pivots will definitely stay. What is your favorite so far?

10x10Collage1 10x10Collage2

 

Woodshed 2013

100 Hours in the Woodshed is a biannual event hosted by Danny O at MCLA’s Gallery 51. This is my third year as a participant. It begins with an opening reception/meet the artists from 5-7 pm on Thursday night, followed by three hours of art-making. We all leave around 10 pm and return on Friday and Saturday at 10 am working until 10 pm. Sunday we come back for eight more hours, again beginning at 10 am and this day working until 6 pm. At that point we strike the set, break down the tables, pile up the art and wait.

Monday, Ryder Cooley, G51′s new gallery manager and Susan Cross, MASS MoCA curator come onto the scene to curate the exhibit, and then it gets installed. Tuesday, like in two days Tuesday, the show opens to the public, from 5-7 pm. Hope to see you there!!

Please come. Please come to see the book I made. And the other stuff too, but I love this little book. I love everything I made. I haven’t been this excited by work I’ve made in ages. The book uses a structure that Alisa Golden is trying to get everyone who makes it call it the Australian Piano Hinge instead of Flat-Style Australian Reverse Piano Hinge binding. I agree with her. I saw the instructions for this on her blog and have been wanting to make it, and this weekend allowed me that opportunity.

Back of the book QUEST

Back of the book QUEST

Quest pages 1-2

Quest pages 1-2

QUEST pages 3-4

QUEST pages 3-4

QUEST pages 5-6

QUEST pages 5-6

QUEST pages 7-8

QUEST pages 7-8

Two important things happened for me this weekend.

1. It was confirmed to me, something that I already know and have read in countless books on creativity, that inspiration doesn’t just happen. Sure there are those moments of insight, but regular, focused work breeds inspiration. By the time I reached 29 hours into the event, two big huge connections happened. One–that one of the things I am doing in the collages that I really like is pairing the flat with the dimensional. This opened up a huge flood of visual connections and the opportunity to create more mindfully. Two, that the way to bring the God thing that I sort of haphazardly stab at here and there is by going back to the pages and pages of notes and writing that I did while earning my Master’s in Religion at Yale–and picking out text from that writing instead of the more cliche attempts that I’ve been making lately.

2. I am ready to move forward from events of two years ago. (If you know, you know. If you don’t–well, just know that I was very sad two years ago, and that sadness is really, finally and completely lifting. Don’t ask me about it.) While the raven will still be seen from time to time, there is a lightness emerging in my color and image choice that I haven’t seen in years. I even am consciously choosing to work with yellow. Unheard of for me. (Not that you will see it in this imagery, just trust me.)

Here’s the other work I made. I’m thinking it would be very much fun to cancel classes tomorrow, stay home and continue working, but I know I won’t be able to give into that urge. But maybe another day this week…

The work ist better in person–the light wasn’t so great today for these pics. I’ll do my best to update with clearer ones, so come on Tuesday so you get the best view!

Go

Go

Follow

Follow

I shall be released

I shall be released

Six collages, the top middle one is my favorite.

Six collages, the top middle one is my favorite.

 

Happy 2013!

I’m a little behind on the whole New Year’s thing, my intention setting got rolled right into the Haiti pre-trip, trip and post-trip, and now on the other side, life is slowly returning to it’s regular rhythms. Beginning tomorrow, I get back on the regular school schedule of getting up at some ridiculous hour to prepare and then head to work.

So 2013. My days will begin with A Year with Rilke: Daily Reading from the Best of Rainer Maria Rilke Translated and Edited by Joanna Macy and Anita Barrows. When I first decided to use this book as my morning inspiration, I was going to continue making a collage-a-day in response to the reading. So I bought my $1.99 Kindle edition that I can read on my iphone and have with me no matter where I find myself. But then I had this brilliant idea, why not do a visual response right in the book? Do my own Humement of sorts. So then I ordered a hard copy of the book and today I began.

I visually responded to both January 12 and 13th entries, honing in on the narrowing circles versus the widening circles, and completely focused on one of the lines from January 13th’s entry from Sonnets to Orpheus II, 13:

Be. And know as well the need to not be

This is the lesson I want to learn this year. To not always have to be doing something. To be okay with just being sometimes. This is my biggest intention. It doesn’t mean I will do nothing, but that I will, every now and then, really and truly rest and just be.

January 12 +13, A Year with Rilke and fabric circles from Onel

January 12 +13, A Year with Rilke and fabric circles from Onel

Onel discusses his work

Onel discusses his work

What you see pictured here is my visual response along with some fabric circles that I got in an exchange with the artist Onel while in Haiti. I gave him one of my Manifest cards, and I got the fabric circles. They will be in some collage soon. I’ll keep you posted.

I invite you to get your own copy of the Macy/Barrows translation and follow along/do your own altered book. If you do, let me know–we can share at the end of the year.

 

Out with the old, welcome the new!

Happy New Year!

New Year's Eve Eve

New Year’s Eve Eve

I am returning to my weekly posting, usually on Sundays–after a great run of Advent posts. I can’t seem to stop the collage making, though! On the 27th I made six more collages, and then today made another in anticipation of the New Year. The Buddha form cut out of different papers fascinates me! I am currently fantasizing about taking my  September 2012 Vogue to a laser cutter and getting thousands of those Buddhas cut.  I have no idea what I would do with them, but 100 Hours in the Woodshed is right around the corner…

Tomorrow is New Year’s Eve. We will be keeping with our commitment to rest and quiet by staying home, making delicious food, dressing in white and practicing recapitulation. We will be using Sally Kempton’s Out with the Old from December’s Yoga Journal to help guide us.

So recapitulation, or taking a look at the successes and failures of the past, taking stock and then looking to how these successes/failures can help my intentions for the new year. As a teacher, I look at every semester as an opportunity to begin a new, but as this calendar year dawns, I have other intentions that I want to bring to my being from deep within my heart. I’ll be using Kelly McGonigal’s Willpower Instinct to help.

Let me know if you are interested in being part of a discussion group related to this.

I am still restless, and now feel the need to amp up my intentions to work through whatever that restlessness is trying to tell me. One thing for certain, rest and play, and in that order, are higher on my list than ever. And, my mind is backed by my will, so I’m expecting miracles.

 

Advent Day Twenty-Three:

Vibrant, electric, tangerine transformed my little girl legs into magic. Or something, and I wanted to put on those orange pants everyday when I was small. My mom would “bribe” me to put on a dress or something else when we went to parties or somewhere by saying I could put my orange awesomeness back on as soon as we got home.

Advent Day Twenty-Three

The girl in today’s collage reminds me of myself as a little girl. Here, looking to the light, wondering, watching, waiting.

Rilke encourages me embrace the darkness, to let it strengthen me, and to be knowing, being, knowing.

Quiet friend who has come so far,
feel how your breathing makes more space around you.
Let this darkness be a bell tower
and you the bell. As you ring,

what batters you becomes your strength.
Move back and forth into the change.
What is it like, such intensity of pain?
If the drink is bitter, turn yourself to wine.

In this uncontainable night,
be the mystery at the crossroads of your senses,
the meaning discovered there.

And if the world has ceased to hear you,
say to the silent earth: I flow.
To the rushing water, speak: I am.

Sonnets to Orpheus II, 29 (Translated by Joanna Macy)

 

 

 

Advent Day Twenty-Two: Be the Change

Be the change you wish to see in the world, is a widely shared and proclaimed quote attributed to Gandhi, and one that I keep in my heart. There’s no proof that Gandhi actually said it, although it may evolve from this phrase also attributed to him: If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him. … We need not wait to see what others do.

One thing Gandhi did know, as do many spiritual, political and other leaders know, is that one person cannot change anything. One person can help steer this change, but it is only by steadily working together that true and radical change can happen.

How can we as Americans work together to protect our children, our families, our friends and co-workers? Is installing armed guards in all our schools the answer? (No.)  Is criminalizing guns the answer? (Maybe.)  What about gun control? (Yes!) Where do love and compassion fit into this discussion?

In the past couple of days, I talked deeply with a couple different people about the role of art in affecting change–how it can memorialize tragic, awful events; become a subtle or not-so-sublte call to action or bring to the light the difficult inequalities and injustices in the world. Much of the work I create quietly invites the viewer to reflect. These conversations challenge me to consider how I might find ways to incorporate this change I want to see in the world more overtly in the work I create. How can I utilize my many resources to encourage a path towards peace for all humanity? I don’t have any answers right now, but my mind is teeming with questions.

Today’s collage features 28 little stars, for the little souls and the adults in their lives who lost their lives so horribly last week in Sandy Hook Elementary school tragedy. May we remember and come together in memory and in action.

Advent Day Twenty-Two

Advent Day Twenty

I listen to books on CD when I work in my studio. Fiction, non-fiction and the occasional inspirational read. A recent book on motivation, will-power and making meaning in your life quoted  Howard Thurman, Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and then go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive. Howard Thurman was a theologian, a world-renowned educator, a philosopher and a poet, and Dean of Marsh Chapel at Boston University from 1953 to 1965. Thurman spent his life working to break barriers of divisiveness that separate people based on race, culture, religion, ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity.

Advent Day Twenty

Thurman also wrote a short piece inspired by the prayer of St. Francis that reminds me of what these days of anticipation and Christmas are about:

When the song of the angels is stilled,
When the star in the sky is gone,
When the kings and princes are home,
When the shepherds are back with their flock,
The work of Christmas begins:
To find the lost,
To heal the broken,
To feed the hungry,
To release the prisoner,
To rebuild the nations,
To bring peace among people,
To make music in the heart.

Advent Day Nineteen

Advent Day Nineteen

I want first of all… to be at peace with myself. I want a singleness of eye, a purity of intention, a central core to my life that will enable me to carry out these obligations and activities as well as I can. I want, in fact–to borrow from the language of the saints–to live “in grace” as much of the time as possible. I am not using this term in a strictly theological sense. By grace I mean an inner harmony, essentially spiritual, which can be translated into outward harmony. I am seeking perhaps what Socrates asked for in the prayer from the Phaedrus when he said, “May the outward and inward man be one.” I would like to achieve a state of inner spiritual grace from which I could function and give as I was meant to in the eye of God.
― Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Gift from the Sea